Surgery and fibromyalgia

There are many problems with having a chronic pain condition. The first one is that it’s hard to differentiate between regular pain and fibro pain. The second is that usual guidelines for things like recovery times are not written with you in mind.

On January 24 I had my first ever surgery to remove all four of my wisdom teeth. I was finally in a place where I could afford to see the dentist, and had known my wisdom teeth needed to come out for a while. I sought out a practice that was done for valuing patient comfort, and even though I was told my surgery would not be straightforward given the growth and position of my wisdom teeth, the dentist assured me that he was absolutely confident he could get it done and everything would be fine.

They told me patients usually can get back to work after three days, and let me tell you right now that if you have fibromyalgia, “usually” doesn’t apply to you. After a year of living with this diagnosis I was pretty confident that I would need more than just three days to recover. I talked to my doctor who confirmed that I should count on at least a week.

It was frustrating to have to try and plan my busy grad school life around a one week recovery, and I could only manage four days and then a day of working from home. What was more frustrating, though, were the myriad well-intentioned people who assured me that I would be back to normal within a few days. Drawing upon their own experiences, they knew that they hadn’t been out of commission for that long, so I shouldn’t be either. It was meant to be reassuring but it also made me angry. Assuming that my disabled body reacts the same way as your abled body just ends up putting a lot of pressure on me . Will you think I’m lazy, lying or not trying hard enough if I end up needing more time to recover?

The week following my surgery was very uncomfortable, sometimes spiking up into the agonizing… and I could not tell whether that was normal or not. Were people who had four teeth cut out of their gums (including sutures) supposed to be in this kind of pain, or was this fibromyalgia making the pain worse, or was the pain a symptom of something going terribly wrong? Did I have a dry socket necessitating a trip to the dentist for relief, or was this normal remodeling of the mouth, or was it just my body going haywire at the trauma and sending me into a severe flare?

It turned out that my healing was spectacular, to the point where the dentist appeared a little impressed at how good the incision sites looked. I told him I had been “in some bad pain” for a few days and he gently dismissed it as normal since the mouth was recovering. I don’t think he quite understood the kind of pain I was talking about, and I didn’t really see the point in explaining.

It has been 11 days since the surgery and I am still recovering. As I predicted, I did end up flaring on the Tuesday following the surgery, and still had to power through it to get myself to work on Wednesday and Thursday (Friday was a work from home day, thankfully). I am recovering from both the surgery, since my lower jaw and teeth still hurt from time to time, as well as a flare, and because I took some time off for the surgery I have work to catch up on.

The bottom line is this: if you have fibromyalgia, any kind of trauma to your body (and surgery IS a trauma) is going to be harder on you than on abled-bodied persons. You probably won’t have the luxury to take off all the time that you need. It is going to suck. Plan accordingly.

CBD self-medicating: what worked for me

I am not a doctor. Please do your own research before deciding if CBD is right for you, and talk to your doctor.

I became aware of CBD for chronic pain through an acquaintance who was kind enough to give me a small bottle of CBD tincture to try. This started me on a journey to figure out whether CBD works for me, and also to figure out the most effective way of ingesting it.

This post goes over the products I’ve tried and which ones I liked. To cut to the chase: My favorite CBD products are the vape pens from Select CBD.

(if you are new to CBD, I encourage reading this informative post on the CBD subreddit)

I tried the following products:

I review these products under the cut.

Continue reading “CBD self-medicating: what worked for me”

My emergency fibro kit

This is a collection of things that I keep together so that I can easily bring it with me anywhere I go. It’s very small which makes it a lot more portable, but obviously does not include bigger items like my cane (which I usually still have in my bag just in case I need it).

The contents of my kit are:

  • Compression gloves [for when my hands start hurting, or when I get too cold in the office but still need to type]
  • Elbow compression sleeve [because working at a desk with a painful elbow is terrible]
  • CBD balm, lavender scented [the lavender helps with stress; at this point I’m unsure if the CBD balm helps with pain]
  • CBD vape, lavender [lavender again helps with stress; vaping CBD does seem to help with my fatigue levels]
  • Medication spares [sometimes I forget to take my medication in the morning. Having spares means I don’t have to go without for the day.]

Hiking with Fibro

On Saturday, I went hiking, and I survived. It was a nice morning hike of about 4.5 miles.

I’ve always loved hiking and the outdoors, but finding time and energy to venture there definitely takes a back seat to finishing all necessary graduate school activities, making sure everything is taken care of for work, and of course the unrelenting Arizona heat when you DO end up having some free time in the summer. And that’s before you have to factor in the limitations imposed by fibromyalgia.
Despite worrying that I would not be able to finish the hike or that the exercise would trigger a flare, it was a wonderful experience, helped by the following:
  • Travel as light as you can. My wonderful boyfriend Marc suggested we take only one bag with water and snacks for the both of us, and it made a big difference not to have to carry extra weight. Especially when going uphill.
  • Get a good night’s rest prior. Make the odds in your favor by having a quiet evening and an early night before heading out to hike. Since having a good night’s sleep is hit or miss with fibromyalgia, consider rescheduling your hike if it’s a day where you just couldn’t get enough sleep.
  • Take as many breaks as you need. I was worried that Marc would get frustrated if I stopped too often, but taking breaks to catch my breath and gently stretched allowed me to go further than I thought I would be able to.
  • Listen to your body. If after catching your breath you feel you are starting to get worn out, turn back! Pushing through an upcoming bout of fibro-related tiredness is one of the best way to trigger a flare. Although, that said…
  • There is some pain you’ll just have to push through. This may be an unpopular piece of advice but hear me out. There is some underlying fibro pain that just is going to be there regardless. When we started hiking my knees started aching within half a mile, and for some reason my wrists (???) started aching too. However they were the kind of dull, fibro-just-hates-me pains, so I decided to push through and enjoy my hike anyway. And I did.
  • Enjoy the achievement. 4.5 miles is not that long for me compared to what I used to be able to do, but I managed it; I told fibro to go eff itself and had a wonderful time with Marc, enjoying the beauty of the Arizona desert. And it felt GOOD.
  • Take the rest of the day off. I had grand plans of doing grad school work in the afternoon but my brain just wasn’t into it. Running errands (groceries) for the week was almost more than I could handle. It’s best to think of hiking as something that will take your whole day or even your whole weekend, that way, you don’t end up panicking because you’ve fallen behind for school or work.
  • I want to go for another hike soon, and perhaps go longer. This particular hike was a little challenging because there was quite a bit of climbing up and down and scrambling over rocks, but it makes the achievement even better! With fibromyalgia, it’s important to make all the little victories count.